Ira Hershel Cumby

Ira Hershel CumbyAge: 72 years18951968

Name
Ira Hershel Cumby
Given names
Ira Hershel
Surname
Cumby
Birth October 18, 1895 36 35
Birth of a brotherWilliam King Cumby
1895
Birth of a sisterIna Cumby
September 24, 1897 (Age 23 months)
Death of a paternal grandmotherSamantha C. Whitehurst
January 9, 1916 (Age 20 years)
MarriageLucille Womble (Cumby)View this family
March 12, 1921 (Age 25 years)
Birth of a daughter
#1
Margaret Genice Cumby (Voight)
February 25, 1922 (Age 26 years)
Birth of a daughter
#2
Janey Lee Cumby (Venglar)
October 18, 1925 (Age 30 years)
Birth of a daughter
#3
Mary Sue Cumby (Borel) (Roundtree)
October 27, 1929 (Age 34 years)
Death of a motherMariah F. Cox
October 21, 1930 (Age 35 years)
Birth of a son
#4
Samuel Vinson Cumby
April 3, 1934 (Age 38 years)
Birth of a grandson
#1
Donald Allen Voight
January 16, 1944 (Age 48 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#2
Gail Genice Voight (May)
March 11, 1945 (Age 49 years)
Birth of a grandson
#3
Ronnie Voight
June 29, 1947 (Age 51 years)
Birth of a grandson
#4
Roger Dixon Venglar
December 18, 1947 (Age 52 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#5
Suzanne Borel (Griggs)
October 3, 1948 (Age 52 years)
Death of a fatherVinson Franklin “Frank” Cumby
October 22, 1948 (Age 53 years)
Note: Cause of death: Nephritis and arterio-scleros
Birth of a granddaughter
#6
Rita Rebecca Voight (Walker)
May 26, 1949 (Age 53 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#7
Teresa Kay Venglar (Orr)
July 19, 1951 (Age 55 years)
Birth of a grandchild
#8
Alden Paul Borel
January 25, 1952 (Age 56 years)
Birth of a grandson
#9
Steven Vinson Cumby
March 31, 1956 (Age 60 years)
Source: S03270
Publication: Research and Entry by Marian Fitzgerald Parent. Contributor of older generation Hammond/s Family by Norma Hammonds. In reference to Van Meter by many sources, namely Henry Howe's Historical Collections of the Great West(Cincinnati:1851)has much to tell us about American frontier life of the late 1700s. Apart from some brief introductory remarks, the article was re-printed by Howe from "Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of the Western Parts of Virginia and Pennsylvania, from the years 1763 until the year 1783, inclusive; together with a View of the State of Society and manners of the first Settlers of the Western County," by the Rev. Dr. Joseph Doddridge, Wellsburgh, Va., 1824
Text:
Date of Import: May 20, 2001
Note: Born in San Diego Naval Hospital.
Birth of a granddaughter
#10
Dana DeAnn Cumby (Sisco)
May 9, 1957 (Age 61 years)
Birth of a granddaughter
#11
Melinda Borel
January 2, 1961 (Age 65 years)
Birth of a grandson
#12
William Denton “Bud” Borel
February 21, 1962 (Age 66 years)
Family Affiliation

Note: Father of Samuel Vinson Cumby, Father-in law of Glynda Fitzgerald Cumby
TRIBUTE

Note: Tribute to Ira Hershel Cumby above under "NOTES" (next to PERSONAL & DETAILS)
Death March 25, 1968 (Age 72 years)
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: 1886Texas
2 years
elder brother
2 years
elder sister
16 months
elder sister
elder sister
Samantha Cumby (Ashcraft)
Birth: April 28, 1889 30 29Texas
Death: January 15, 1974Mansfield, Tarrant, Texas, USA
4 years
elder sister
4 years
brother
10 months
himself
23 months
younger sister
Ina Cumby
Birth: September 24, 1897 38 37Seaton, Bell, Texas, USA
Death: March 29, 1972Temple, Bell, Texas, USA
Father’s family with E.J. McDowell - View this family
father
step-mother
Marriage: December 21, 1881Fannin County, Texas, USA
Family with Lucille Womble (Cumby) - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: March 12, 1921Bell County, Texas, USA
11 months
daughter
4 years
daughter
4 years
daughter
4 years
son

Family Affiliation
Father of Samuel Vinson Cumby, Father-in law of Glynda Fitzgerald Cumby
TRIBUTE
Tribute to Ira Hershel Cumby above under "NOTES" (next to PERSONAL & DETAILS)
Note
Ira Hershel Cumby was a tall thin man. All his life he wore his hair combed straight back. He was quite a character—funny and lovable. The first time Ira saw Lucille Womble, he was nine years old. She was one day old, but he commented that some day he was going to marry her. Lucille once told me that when Ira was a young man and it was cotton picking time, Ira and his brother, King, did not get to the field until well after the sun was up because they had been out drinking all night. After a day in the field, the two brothers left the fields before everyone else, and they would have picked twice the cotton of anyone else. I remember his hands --his fingers were long and elegant--and good for picking cotton, I guess. Ira was a soldier during WWI. He was fortunate not to have been sent abroad due to an illness that kept him in the hospital in New York. Returning to central Texas, he and Lucille married in 1921. They started their family—four children each born four years apart. They farmed and together ran a series of bars, nightclubs, saloons. (The Hi Ho Inn, The Blue Goose were a few.) Generally they lived in the same location--that was fun for their son and many times difficult for his three sisters. During WWII, the family moved to South Texas where Ira went to work at Dow Chemical Company. Because of an extreme shortage in housing, the family lived at first in a barracks-type facility called Camp Chemical. Shell walkways got people from one location to the other, but otherwise things were muddy and mosquitoes made life miserable. From Camp Chemical, the family moved to a trailer park, which was located on Dow’s land. Then they lived in several different places in Velasco, Texas (now known as Freeport). The Cumby family came into my life when I was 15 years old and madly in love with their only son, Sam. They were wonderful to me and the next year when Sam and I eloped to Bay City, Sam’s mom (Mamo) and dad (Papo) went with us. Sam was in uniform. He was 18 years old and I was 16 (though I would turn 17 the next month.) The second year we were married , I moved in with Mamo and Papo and lived there until I joined Sam in California. They were wonderful to me—generous with their love and with all they had. Of all the things to say about Ira and Lucille, their generosity was paramount. When one of their adult children needed help because of a shortage of money, Sam’s parents were there to help. If they had no income at all, the family took them in. After Sam got out of the Navy, he started to college. We had one baby when he started and another just in time for the first spring finals. Mamo and Papo frequently helped with money—a $20 bill in a letter was a precious gift. Sometimes they helped with tuition and each change of season brought a big box of new clothes for Steve and Dana. We never would have made it without their help. And here is the thing: they would never let any of us pay them back. They felt we were all family and whatever they had belonged to all of us. We, in turn, raised our children with the same philosophy. Ira and Lucille taught me about family and about generosity. Their love for me was a very precious thing in my life.
Media objectIra Hershel CumbyIra Hershel Cumby
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Media objectIra Hershel CumbyIra Hershel Cumby
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 1,223 × 1,849 pixels
File size: 712 KB
Type: Photo
Highlighted image: yes
Media objectIra Hershel CumbyIra Hershel Cumby
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 1,223 × 1,849 pixels
File size: 712 KB
Type: Photo
Highlighted image: yes
Media objectIra Hershel CumbyIra Hershel Cumby
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 1,223 × 1,849 pixels
File size: 712 KB
Type: Photo
Highlighted image: yes